Outlook Climate Art

Climate change art can help people connect on many levels with the challenging topic. We find ourselves asking what role does art play in communicating climate change and helping people express their fears, anxieties, and hopes.

We want to bring attention to an approach that we have found very exciting that uses data and art. Jill Pelto, both a scientist and artist, will be hosting a data-art workshop in the Fall of 2022 in collaboration with Long Island School in Maine with students who are utilizing Climate Change Observatory sites developed on Oceanside Conservation Trust’s (OCT) conserved properties.

Quahog_Square.jpegReplanting Resilience_website(left).jpegJill Pelto: Science-Art Collaborations

Watch and listen to Jill Pelto’s story below and visit her Instagram and website to learn more about her work.

 

“I am a climate change artist and my passion is constructing new ways to communicate science through art. Scientific research and data fuel the content of my artwork. I create pieces that raise awareness about interesting and important environmental topics. The key topic in my portfolio is climate change data: melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and the increasing use of renewable energy. I hope to cover both positive and negative issues that depict the reality of our current ecosystem.

Art is a uniquely articulate and emotional lens: through it I can address environmental concerns to raise awareness and inspire people to take action. I view art as a powerful platform to ground climate change discussion in everyday life and culture. My goal is to collaborate in order to reach a broader audience. I want to team up with fellow scientists, artists, and people from any discipline.

Nature is fascinating and beautiful, and I hope you will help me fight to preserve it!

I enjoy collaborations and commissions that help share climate stories in new ways. I have teamed up with scientific research groups, conservation organizations, and small businesses to use new platforms to communicate environmental change.” ~ Jill Pelto